Easy Grafting Technique for Adenium (Desert Rose)

The Adenium obesum is one of the most grafted among ornamental plants in Asia, and for good reason. So many beautiful varieties of interesting colors, patterns and forms have come about.

For quite some time I've been toying with the idea of grafting an Adenium obesum or Desert Rose plant. Actually, I've previously done a V-cut or Wedge graft on an Adenium obesum plant. It was a third attempt and the only successful one thus far.

My only regret is not having experimented this flat-cut grafting much sooner. Never did I realize is that it would be much easier to do than the wedge graft once you know the simple technique. This is at least true for Adeniums.

Shown below is the beautiful red Adenium plant that was successfully grafted to the more common pink Adenium variety. In other words, the scion came from an Adenium plant with red petals with black edges while the stock was of the pink colored flower. The flower from the grafted adenium has deep red colored petals with black edges and a yellow throat.


"SangRasSaMee" is the name of this red hybrid. The dark red petals that contrast with bright yellow throat make this hybrid interesting.





Step by Step Guide for a Simple Flat Graft Technique

Materials

  • Clear bag - Small sized clear plastic bag to cover and protect the scion until the graft cut heals. It also helps maintain humidity.
  • Clear strip - 1" by 5" strip cut from clear plastic sheet.
  • Rubber band or twist ties - For tying and securing the clear bag.
  • Scotch tape or tying material - For securing the Adenium scion to the Adenium stock.
  • Adenium stock
  • Adenium scion


Tools
  • Scissors - For cutting the clear strip and tying materials.
  • Cutter or Sharp garden knife - For cutting the Adenium stock and scion.




Procedure

  1. Find a portion of a healthy branch of the Adenium stock that will be suitable for the graft. Feel the branch to estimate its thickness and regularity of shape. Generally, a thickness of about 1/2" to 3/4" inch would be adequate.


  2. Select a portion of a healthy branch of the Adenium scion that will be suitable for the graft. Try to match the thickness with that of the selected portion in the Adenium stock. With a sharp cutter or knife, cut a length of the Adenium scion that is around 1" to 2". I usually choose a length that would have 2 nodes in it. Notice the branch below is a bit long and you could cut several pieces of it that would serve as scions.


  3. Cut the Adenium stock branch at the grafting point. Make the cut flat and as clean as possible.




    Notice that the Adenium stock branch is more mature and wrinkly in appearance than the greenish Adenium scion.


  4. You might notice sap coming out from the wound of the Adenium stock and scion. No need to wipe this and do not touch the newly cut wounds of either the Adenium stock or the scion. This is to avoid contamination on the freshly cut wounds.



(See Part 2 for the continuation of this article)




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Anonymous said...

thanks!